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Welcome to the home of over 200 Military CAMO Patterns on apparel , bags and packs!
Welcome to the home of over 200 Military CAMO Patterns on apparel , bags and packs!
Rhodesian Brushstroke Camouflage

Rhodesian Brushstroke Camouflage

Checkout our Rhodesian Camouflage

Rhodesian Brushstroke is a camouflage pattern used by the Rhodesian Security Forces from 1965 until its replacement by a vertical lizard stripe in 1980. It was the default camouflage appearing on battledress of the Rhodesian Army and British South Africa Police, although used in smaller quantities by INTAF personnel. The design was also used on uniforms issued to South African Special Forces for clandestine operations. A similar pattern is fielded by the Zimbabwe National Army. Several companies manufacture new production Rhodesian Brushstroke clothing for the civilian market.

Rhodesian Brushstroke consists of large, contrasting, shapes tailored to break up the outline of an object. Like most disruptive camouflage, the pattern is dependent on countershading, utilizing hues with high-intensity contrast or noticeable differences in chromaticity.

Prior to Rhodesia's Unilateral Declaration of Independence, enlisted personnel in the Rhodesian Army were issued with uniforms in khaki drill. The Battle of Sinoia and the outbreak of the Rhodesian Bush War prompted the security forces to devise a more appropriate uniform especially designed for the region. This incorporated a three color, high contrast, disruptive fabric with green and brown strokes on a sandy background. Early shortages of textile and equipment were overcome with South African and Portuguese technical assistance, and a home industry for the new battledress developed. The pattern was supposedly designed by Di Cameron of David Whitehead Textiles.

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