Russian Woodland Brown CAMO

Entering service in 1981, the Soviet tritsvetnaia kamuflirovannaia odezhda (TTsKO) or three-color camouflage uniform (pattern) became one of the most ubiquitous designs in the USSR and the ex-Soviet republics. The colloquial name for this pattern is Бутан or butan (butane), which was the original project name for the camouflage development program. Initially produced as a six-pocket combat uniform for airborne and spetsnaz personnel, the pattern eventually saw production on insulated winter uniforms, aviation uniforms, and special one-piece jumpsuits. The number of intentionally produced color and drawing variations is manifold, with many ex-Soviet republics adopting one or more derivative patterns of their own following the breakup of the Soviet Union. This is probably the most varied of any Soviet-designed camouflage pattern, although sadly its use even in ex-Soviet republics is gradually drawing to a close. Although the main color variants can be divided into green- and -brown dominant, a number of sub-variants have been documented, including pink, tan, oxblood, green/blue, a bi-color variant, and a special muted pattern reputedly issued to reconnaissance personnel. Seen below are a handful of Russian-made variants, with an appropriate descriptive term applied to each.